Category: Providence

Belly announce 2016 reunion.

Sweet Ride: Belly’s Triumphant Return

Sitting down with the reunited members of Belly in a Middletown, RI, coffee shop is a great reminder about the importance of band chemistry. My questions are frequently derailed as the group — singer/guitarist Tanya Donelly, guitarist Tom Gorman, bassist Gail Greenwood + drummer Chris Gorman — dissolves into laughter over a shared joke or surreal, salty asides. So right away you can throw out the idea that the band’s reunion after 20+ years is a nostalgia trip or a callow cash-in.

In a way, though, it’s an opportunity to rewrite history. The band, which was founded by former Throwing Muses songwriter + guitarist Tanya Donelly (she was also a co-founder of Kim Deal’s Breeders), had fairy-tale success out of the starting gate — particularly with the release of their fizzy pop masterpiece, Star, in 1993.

Star’s punchy follow-up, King, was recorded with rock producer Glyn Johns in the Bahamas and was met — unfairly, one could definitively add — with a sophomore slump-style backlash that ground the band, exhausted from endless buzz-bin touring, to a screeching halt.

You can sense how strongly they all wished for a different outcome, particularly Tanya, who began performing select King songs (and Belly songs in general) during her live sets over the past few years.

Read More

Al Forno owners George Germon & Johanne Killeen

In Memoriam: George Germon, 1945-2015

“Providence has a great history, and the deeper you get into it, the more you love it.” –George Germon

Back in 2008, I was lucky enough to work near the future location of Tini’s, which was the much-buzzed about sequel of sorts to Al Forno, the restaurant that (almost single-handedly) put Providence on the culinary map.

Read More

Lightning Bolt at the Roundhouse, London, Spring 2015.

Taking On Providence’s Wunderground

The October issue of Take Magazine fixes its lens on the weird, many-headed hydra that is the Providence noise scene.

Writer Phil Eil (formerly news editor of the much-missed Providence Phoenix, where I also cut my teeth) admits straight away that the multivalent topic “could be a book,” and that the “scene is complex and unclassifiable — but important to acknowledge.” [The piece is print-only, but Eil has written a colorful intro here.]

With only 2,400 words to pin down a multidisciplinary, slippery beast, he makes the canny decision to present discrete moments in time — snapshots in Technicolor.

I talked to Phil for the piece, and did my best to paint a picture of how the scene “was just a balance of chaos and community,” as AS220’s Dave Dvorchak puts it.

Read More

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén